(207) 621-3408 ucls@maine.edu

2017 Sessions

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May
18
Thu
Active Learning Simulator
May 18 @ 7:30 am – 8:45 am

Technology ToolsExperience what it’s like to be a student participating in a course designed with technology-enhanced active learning strategies! You will collaborate with your fellow “classmates”, play with some new technology, and maybe pick up something new for your pedagogical toolkit. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptop or other device to participate, but it is not required. You will also need to access a maine.edu or Google account. Finally, we recommend you look over some of the session materials ahead of time via this link: goo.gl/fxL1U3

BYOD

Michael Matis is a Learning Designer at the University of Southern Maine’s Center for Technology Enhanced Learning. His M.Ed in Instructional Technology combined with his background as a veteran IT Professional have given him a broad skill-set in the integration of technology that focuses on learner-centric outcomes, coaching fellow educators to increase their digital resilience, and designing authentic assessments.

Angela is the Assistant Director of US:IT Classroom Technology. She has worked with the University of Southern Maine since 2001 and became a part of the US:IT Classroom Technology team in June 2015. Angela’s experience in the classroom technology field includes design, construction and installation of a wide-range of systems across the University of Maine System. She works closely with faculty, staff and students to improve their teaching and learning environments.

Early Bird Session: Roundtable–Supporting Student Success in Blackboard
May 18 @ 8:00 am – 8:40 am

What makes a student successful in online learning? How can you design your course to support students who are still developing their executive function skills? How can you actively engage your students when so much of what they do is in solitude at a distance? Share your ideas and challenges with your colleagues and lets work together to create a list of Tips for Success.

BYOD

Anne Fensie is an Instructional Designer with University College with an office in Augusta serving faculty throughout the state. Anne has taught at the high school level, in college, and through adult education. Her experience includes teaching, professional development, curriculum writing, and administration. With a focus on improving education outcomes for all learners, faculty find her patience and resourcefulness a welcome support. Anne is a specialist in Microsoft products and is skilled in multimedia production, including web design and video editing. Anne earned her Bachelor of Music Education from Ithaca College and a Master of Education in Instructional Technology from Bridgewater State College.

Early Bird Session: Students’ Motivations for Plagiarism and Instructors’ Choices in Teaching Sources
May 18 @ 8:00 am – 8:40 am

Teaching & LearningWhy do students choose to use sources in ways that violate our academic integrity standards? Drawing on the experiences of attendees and the findings of researchers, we’ll move into a discussion of how instructors and librarians might develop assignments and lessons that are conscious of the multiple, competing purposes that affect the ways students incorporate sources into their work.

Elizabeth Powers is Assistant Professor of English at University of Maine at Augusta, where she coordinates the Writing Center and teaches courses in the Humanities program.

Ben Treat is the Interim Director of Library Services at the University of Maine at Augusta.

Keynote: Design for the Mind: Strategies from the Psychology of Learning
May 18 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am

Michelle MillerEducators are all in the business of changing minds: We build new memories, guide students in developing new skills, and promote the development of values and mindsets. Attention, memory, and higher thought processes are three aspects of the mind that are particularly critical to learning, and are areas where instructional technology can be the most helpful. In this interactive talk, we will explore and experience principles connected to these three aspects of the mind, emphasizing the unique advantages that technology offers as we strive to use these principles in our teaching.

Dr. Miller is the Director of the First Year Initiative at the University College of Northern Arizona University and a President’s Distinguished Teaching Fellow in the Department of Psychology at Northern Arizona University.  She is also the author of the book, Minds Online: Teaching Effectively with Technology, from Harvard University Press (2014), which is a definitive guide for online-teaching faculty that explores not only pertinent cognitive strategies for engaging distance learners, but also learning theory in practice.

Read more about Dr. Miller

Active Learning Simulator
May 18 @ 10:40 am – 11:30 am

Technology ToolsExperience what it’s like to be a student participating in a course designed with technology-enhanced active learning strategies! You will collaborate with your fellow “classmates”, play with some new technology, and maybe pick up something new for your pedagogical toolkit. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptop or other device to participate, but it is not required. You will also need to access a maine.edu or Google account. Finally, we recommend you look over some of the session materials ahead of time via this link: goo.gl/fxL1U3

BYOD

Michael Matis is a Learning Designer at the University of Southern Maine’s Center for Technology Enhanced Learning. His M.Ed in Instructional Technology combined with his background as a veteran IT Professional have given him a broad skill-set in the integration of technology that focuses on learner-centric outcomes, coaching fellow educators to increase their digital resilience, and designing authentic assessments.

Angela is the Assistant Director of US:IT Classroom Technology. She has worked with the University of Southern Maine since 2001 and became a part of the US:IT Classroom Technology team in June 2015. Angela’s experience in the classroom technology field includes design, construction and installation of a wide-range of systems across the University of Maine System. She works closely with faculty, staff and students to improve their teaching and learning environments.

Basic Pedagogical Principles for Creating Multimedia Learning Environments
May 18 @ 10:40 am – 11:30 am

Teaching & LearningThis presentation will show a variety of multimedia design principles based on the latest research findings. Using Kaltura as the multimedia environment, effective examples will be contrasted with non-examples that demonstrate basic design principles. Some of the issues include: split-attention, redundancy, signaling, congruity, segmenting, and personalization.

With over 20 years of instructional design experience, Marilyn has incorporated these principles when supporting faculty and when teaching Instructional Technology. As part of a federally funded grant initiative, she led a Multimedia course that partnered faculty with in-service teachers.

Civic Engagement in Distance Courses
May 18 @ 10:40 am – 11:30 am

Civic Engagement is one of the core college experiences for thousands of students in the University of Maine system. Alternatively called ‘Community Engagement’ or ‘Service Learning’, civic engagement provides students with a university-based real-world educational experience. This is also a great medium for the university to engage in problem solving with the local community leadership, businesses and non-profits, while simultaneously serving the needs of a future generation of workforce. As such, civic engagement has a long history in American public education with evidence backing up its effectiveness toward student success. However, contemporary civic engagement continues to be designed for an onsite/ face-to-face classroom even as the number of online courses and programs skyrocket. This session will introduce participants to a toolkit that can expand the scope of this high impact teaching practice to an online environment. This faculty toolkit is being developed by University College in collaboration with the University of Southern Maine’s Center for Technology Enhanced Learning. It includes a Handbook of Civic Engagement based on that created by the University of South Dakota, tips for getting started with a community partner at a distance and designing student interactions in an online classroom, and much more.

Araminta “Mina” Matthews is the Senior Instructional Designer for University College and the primary coordinator of the UC Faculty Institute. She has oversight of UC’s online writing lab (VAWLT), the Teaching Online Community of Practice (formerly known as the Short Course), and UC’s new career-integration and exploration service (VOICES). She leads a collaborative team of instructional designers for University College. Her passion is supporting collaborations, designing strong eLearning pedagogy with an efficient workflow to help students achieve the greatest success, and offering workshops to boost comfort with technology-enhanced teaching and learning. Mina holds a terminal degree in Creative Writing (MFA) as well as certificates in teaching, digital curation, and global career development facilitation. In her spare time, she is also an adjunct, teaching creative writing at various campuses in the system, and she is a professional author of genre fiction.

Lois-Ann Kuntz is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Maine at Machias and the Chair of the Arts & Letters Division. She has been teaching both online and using service-learning for over 10 years, and she received Maine Campus Compact’s highest faculty award, the Donald Harward Award for Service-Learning Excellence. She co-coordinated the process of the Psychology & Community Studies program becoming an Engaged Department for both campus and distance tracks which is discussed in her chapter in Service-Learning and Civic Engagement: A Sourcebook, SAGE publications. She has delivered eService Learning courses since 2010, and has been a developer and facilitator for the Maine Campus Compact’s faculty “FUSION” courses since 2012.

Sally Slovenski (MA) is the Executive Director of Maine Campus Compact (MCC). In this role, she is responsible for overseeing the daily operations of MCC including the overall direction of the organization and working with MCC’s 18 Maine-based member campuses who have made a commitment to community engagement. Prior to her role at Maine Campus Compact, Ms. Slovenski was the Executive Director of the Illinois-based States United to Prevent Gun Violence and the Manager of Teacher and Student Programs at Earthwatch Institute in Massachusetts. She has an MA in Political Philosophy from the University of York, England and a BA in Sociology from Bates College.

Rucha Modak is the Senior Learning Designer for the Center for Technology Enhanced Learning (CTEL) at the University of Southern Maine. Prior to joining USM in 2013, she was a doctoral student in the Instructional Systems program at Penn State University and a graduate assistant in the university’s Education Technology Services unit. At USM, Rucha provides instructional design and faculty development support to faculty teaching a technology-enhanced course, predominantly fully online. She also provides support to CTEL’s strategic initiatives, including program development and collaborates on joint ventures with colleagues across the University of Maine system.

FREE Interactive Learning Tools in the F2F Class
May 18 @ 10:40 am – 11:30 am

This interactive workshop will explore practical and easy to use technology tools that can enhance the classroom experience and support instructor/student and student/student interactions. The ultimate goal when integrating interactive learning technologies is to empower students with more ownership in their learning with instructors acting as facilitators in guiding student activities. Keeping learning at the forefront, interactive tools can help in promoting sound pedagogy. Workshop participants will be introduced to several practical and user friendly (free) interactive tools that can be easily implemented and utilized to facilitate course content, build collaboration//community and enhance student learning. Tools to be discussed include: 1) Communication Tools; 2) Course Resource Tools; 3) Audio/Video Tools; and 4) Google Tools.

BYOD

Ashley Montgomery (Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Curriculum & Instruction (2000)) is the Director of the Teaching & Learning Collaborative (TLC) at UMF. She moved to Maine in 2000 from Tennessee and never imagined she would be here all these years later. In her work at the University of Maine at Farmington, she teaches both first year and graduate classes. She also mentors new faculty, supports all aspects of faculty teaching, technology integration and works with UMS level strategic planning around teaching, learning and technology. Her other areas of interest include personal learning network, online identity construction and digital citizenship. As a fairly proficient user of technology, when she is asked to trouble shoot technology, she responds “I know how to drive the car, but please don’t ask me to fix it.”

Hello, Blackboard, is anyone there?
May 18 @ 10:40 am – 11:30 am

How can an instructor engage students within Blackboard? Blackboard is capable of many great things, and this session introduces and demonstrates the concept of online engagement with students on Blackboard. Participants will learn and will contribute their own experience how to use Blackboard communication tools in their course. We will discuss recommended Blackboard practice in teaching and learning. This workshop suits anyone who is involved in online or “blended” teaching, whether new to Blackboard or those who would like to refresh their use of Blackboard in teaching.

 

With over 15 years of full-time classroom teaching experience at the University Maine, Colby College and Bates College, Andrei Strukov understands needs and challenges that faculty face – and he speaks their language. He strongly believes that student engagement in any course – face-to-face, distance, or blended – is the key to success for student achievement and faculty expectations of learning outcomes.

Is the Flipped Classroom Scalable? Exploring Ways to Effectively Engage Students in Larger Classrooms
May 18 @ 10:40 am – 11:30 am

The flipped classroom has received considerable attention in the recent past because of its effectiveness in promoting student engagement. Despite their popularity in smaller class settings, these techniques have not been as widely applied in larger classes. In this session, I describe my application of engaged learning approaches to 60 student classes at the University of Maine as a foundation for an open discussion and idea exchange of flipped classroom approaches and their transferability from smaller to larger classroom settings. Please bring your own experiences and ideas!

BYOD

Betty J. Woodman has a Ph.D. from Emory University in Applied Ethics, focusing on the philosophy of social psychology. She has also studied, developed, and taught engaged learning approaches and courses at Emory University. Currently, Betty teaches humanities courses at UMA as well as leadership, ethics, and marketing in the Maine Business School in Orono. This year, she utilized engaged learning approaches previously used in 20-student classes for her 60- student classes.

Unlocking Your Experiential Educator Potential
May 18 @ 10:40 am – 11:30 am

Teaching & LearningThis session is an opportunity for seasoned and new educators to learn about new ways of thinking about teaching and learning. Model the way of life-long learning, growth and development by joining us for a dynamic session to unlock your experiential educator potential. Learn a holistic educator framework for building meaningful learning as you guide learners through the learning cycle. Participants will learn about the dynamic experiential educator roles in lifelong learning and in building meaningful learning spaces. We will explore the characteristics of each of the four roles assessed in the Educator Role Profile (ERP) and the significance of having educators change roles as they guide learners through the learning cycle. Opportunities are afforded to explore and clarify educational values, beliefs and professional philosophy and their alignment with their teaching practices. Participants will be given access to take the ERP to identify their instructional characteristics.

Elizabeth Fisher Turesky is an Associate Professor of Leadership and Organizational Studies at the University of Southern Maine, where she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in Leadership, Leadership Study Abroad, Organizational Change and Development, Organizational Behavior, Group Dynamics and Training and Development. She has won several awards for her teaching, research and service, including the Maine Campus Compact’s Donald Harward Faculty Award for Service-Learning Excellence. Her scholarship focuses on the nexus of experiential learning and leadership development and women and leadership. She has published in such journals as the Organizational Management Journal, Academic Leadership Journal, Journal of Leadership Education, The Coaching Psychologist and Career and Adult Development Journal. She has led organizational change efforts, conducted workshops and presented nationally and internationally at conferences on Change Leadership, Team Development, Conflict Management, Learning and Teaching Styles, Creative Pedagogy and Women and Leadership. Her teaching and scholarship are rooted in experiential learning principals with an abiding commitment to create inclusive, nurturing learning environments. She holds a masters degree in Public Administration from the University of Colorado, a doctorate from Case Western Reserve University’s Department of Organizational Behavior, the Weatherhead School of Management.

We Did the Mash! Exploring Online Training and Peer Learning through Collaboration
May 18 @ 10:40 am – 11:30 am

In this session, participants will interact with and assess the public-facing VAWLT (Virtual Academic Writing Lab Tutors) and OCLS (Off-Campus Library Services) tutor training currently available via Creative Commons license online. Participants will have the opportunity to explore the learning experience and to contribute quick, anonymous feedback on the training to strengthen the virtual presence of a student tutor. Presenters will then lead a discussion on innovative ways to deploy our tutor-training to students at your campuses, and strategies for developing similar training with a team of peer tutors. We’ll present findings and goals from our collaboration with UM’s Writing Center to provide embedded writing support to Winter ‘16/17 courses, and its planned Summer ‘17 cohort. We will also present progress on a pilot to cross-train virtual writing tutors in baseline library and research skills. Attendees will be provided with relevant supporting research in peer learning and participatory learning theory and will be invited to add to an annotated resource list. BYOD.

BYOD

As Coordinator of the UC VAWLT (Virtual Academic Writing and Library Tutors), Michelle is privileged to team with talented students, staff, and educators to deliver writing support across the UMaine System. She also enjoys working in distance education as a part of the University College Instructional Design and Development Department. A poet and short story writer, Michelle earned a BA in English and Communication at the University of Delaware and an MFA in Fiction Writing at Columbia University. She moved to Maine in 2002 to help her husband launch an independent video rental store in Brunswick. Since 2004, she has taught English, Humanities as well as test prep courses and tutored in writing centers at UMA, USM and CMCC. As an instructor, Michelle has developed multiple seminars focused on media and writing; as a coordinator, she has served the UMA Writing Center as well as the UC VAWLT, which she established with the UC ID&D team. Michelle’s favorite things are coffee, her 7 year old, and her two cats; she hates team sports, gender-normative children’s programming, and the word “moist.”

As Acting Director for OCLS, Stacey brings to UC over eleven years of experience in public, academic and special libraries. She earned a Bachelor’s degree in English with a minor in Journalism in 2003 and her Master of Science in Library Science in 2007 from Clarion University of Pennsylvania. She brings experience in embedded and virtual librarianship and in teaching information literacy and first year experience. Stacey loves helping students see research as a journey and scholarship as a conversation. When she is not traveling to other centers or campuses, Stacey can be found in the Katz Library building on the UMA campus.

Paige Mitchell directs the University of Maine’s Writing Center, and is a PhD candidate in the department of Education, concentrating in Writing Center administration, literacy, and composition & rhetoric. She obtained her MA in English concentrating in gender and critical analysis, and her BA with a double concentration in creative writing and professional and technical writing, as well as graduating from the honors college. Her research interests include Writing Center collaborative practice and contemporary research in multimodality, assessment, and translingual pedagogy and ethnographic and autoethnographic documentations of cultures, histories, and genders.

Active Learning Simulator
May 18 @ 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm

Technology ToolsExperience what it’s like to be a student participating in a course designed with technology-enhanced active learning strategies! You will collaborate with your fellow “classmates”, play with some new technology, and maybe pick up something new for your pedagogical toolkit. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptop or other device to participate, but it is not required. You will also need to access a maine.edu or Google account. Finally, we recommend you look over some of the session materials ahead of time via this link: goo.gl/fxL1U3

Michael Matis is a Learning Designer at the University of Southern Maine’s Center for Technology Enhanced Learning. His M.Ed in Instructional Technology combined with his background as a veteran IT Professional have given him a broad skill-set in the integration of technology that focuses on learner-centric outcomes, coaching fellow educators to increase their digital resilience, and designing authentic assessments.

Angela is the Assistant Director of US:IT Classroom Technology. She has worked with the University of Southern Maine since 2001 and became a part of the US:IT Classroom Technology team in June 2015. Angela’s experience in the classroom technology field includes design, construction and installation of a wide-range of systems across the University of Maine System. She works closely with faculty, staff and students to improve their teaching and learning environments.

Considering Student Accessibility in Crafting Electronic Media
May 18 @ 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm

Do you ever wonder HOW your students are actually experiencing your class? In this hands-on exploratory workshop, you will get a chance to experience how students with disabilities access your course utilizing a variety of assistive technologies. From this perspective, we will look at how to avoid some common accessibility errors in course design and in the creation of course materials, as well as collect tools and resources that will save you time and increase student access.

BYOD

Joanne is the director of the Disability Services Center at USM. Her primary role is direct service provision to students with disabilities addressing access issues both in and out of the classroom. She brings with her several years of experience assisting students navigating the online experience as well as working with faculty to remove accessibility barriers.

Heather Nunez-Olmstead is an Instructional Designer at University College with an MSEd in Curriculum and Instructional Design. She has experience with teaching and designing live, distance and blended course, and specializes in student engagement techniques.

Five things you need to know to get up and running with Blackboard
May 18 @ 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm

Welcome to Blackboard! There is a lot you can do with this Learning Management System and new users can get easily overwhelmed. Let us point out the five things you need to know to get up and running with Blackboard for your online, hybrid, or tech enhanced class. We will also point you to some resources for self-study to improve your Blackboard skills and describe the supports available to you throughout the University of Maine System.

BYOD

Anne Fensie is an Instructional Designer with University College with an office in Augusta serving faculty throughout the state. Anne has taught at the high school level, in college, and through adult education. Her experience includes teaching, professional development, curriculum writing, and administration. With a focus on improving education outcomes for all learners, faculty find her patience and resourcefulness a welcome support. Anne is a specialist in Microsoft products and is skilled in multimedia production, including web design and video editing. Anne earned her Bachelor of Music Education from Ithaca College and a Master of Education in Instructional Technology from Bridgewater State College.

Flipping the Calculus Classroom — Engaging students in small group learning in what is traditionally a large lecture class
May 18 @ 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm

This session will model the process used for learning in my calculus 1 flipped classroom. First, participants will watch a short video and take an online quiz (similar to what my students do prior to coming to class). Then, we will “start class” by utilizing some warm-up clicker questions which will lead into working in small groups on an activity. Throughout the modelled lesson, I will discuss the successes and pitfalls that I have experienced while teaching with a flipped model. The content topic will not be calculus, but instead a very accessible math topic from the middle school curriculum.

Jennifer Tyne has been a Lecturer in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Maine for 15 years. She has taught in traditional, completely online, and hybrid formats over the past decade, and started experimenting with the flipped classroom model when Estabrooke 130 (the large active learning classroom at UM) was built 2 years ago. She utilizes Maine Learning Assistants (MLAs) in the classroom to facilitate clicker discussions and small group work.

Online Collaborative Program Design: Perspectives on the Process
May 18 @ 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm

Over the last two years faculty from three campuses (UMF, UM, and USM) have been involved in designing a 100% online collaborative Masters of Education in Instructional Technology. Additionally, we have undertaken an intentional redesign of program curriculum. In this panel we’ll share how we approached this work, including our five central questions: – Learning Environments: How do educators leverage technology to create environments that support the development of diverse skills, and emphasize challenging learning experiences? – Teaching and Learning: How can technology enhance teaching and learning partnerships that support and promote innovative models of deeper learning? – Digital Citizenship: How can educators promote an understanding of the social, ethical and legal issues and responsibilities related to a globally connected society? – Professional Practice: How can educators develop and model pedagogical and andragogical principles of learning to promote professional growth and practice in a globally connected society? – Leadership: How can educators align vision, implementation, and practice to foster learning enhanced by technology? We will share how these questions have been translated into program outcomes, course blueprints, and learning activities. Faculty from the program will share experiences and reflections on this intentional approach to program and curriculum design.

Dr. Johanna Prince is the Director of Graduate Programs in Education at UMF and Program Coordinator for a collaborative Masters of Education in Instructional Technology (UMF, USM, UM). She teaches graduate courses in research and educational technology; and in all teaching focuses on how teacher practice is connected to student outcomes. She has taught in K-12 and higher education settings.

Dr. Meredith Swallow is an Assistant Professor of Elementary Education at the University of Maine at Farmington. In her work at UMF, Meredith teaches in both undergraduate and graduate programs, as well as in the M.Ed. in Instructional Technology collaborative. Prior to joining the UMF community, Meredith was a mathematics teacher focused on engaged and active learning, by supporting the connection of knowledge through interaction, understanding, and meaning. Meredith earned her PhD in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at the University of Vermont with a research focus on K-8 technology integration. At UMF, Meredith is collaborating with pre-service teachers on effective models of proficiency based learning, and developing research on understanding how we can leverage technology to best support teaching and learning in this model.

Donna Karno, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education and Chair of the Division of Early Childhood and Elementary Education at the University of Maine at Farmington. Donna serves as Children’s Program Liaison between UMF and the three affiliated campus children’s programs. Her teaching and research focus is the adoption and use of developmentally appropriate interactive technology in early childhood that includes child-child interaction, teacher-child interaction, and teacher training in technology use.

Ashley Montgomery (Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Curriculum & Instruction (2000)) is the Director of the Teaching & Learning Collaborative (TLC) at UMF. She moved to Maine in 2000 from Tennessee and never imagined she would be here all these years later. In her work at the University of Maine at Farmington, she teaches both first year and graduate classes. She also mentors new faculty, supports all aspects of faculty teaching, technology integration and works with UMS level strategic planning around teaching, learning and technology. Her other areas of interest include personal learning network, online identity construction and digital citizenship. As a fairly proficient user of technology, when she is asked to trouble shoot technology, she responds “I know how to drive the car, but please don’t ask me to fix it.”

Strategies and web-based tools designed to increase and deepen student engagement in asynchronous online discussion forums
May 18 @ 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm

Teaching & LearningResearch indicates it is challenging to foster a focused, interactive, and in-depth asynchronous discussion in a traditional threaded online discussion forum. The target audience for this interactive workshop is university faculty who teach online courses using the Blackboard course management system. This presentation will introduce participants to evidence-based pedagogical strategies and various functionalities of the Blackboard discussion board tool designed to increase and strengthen student engagement during topical asynchronous online discussions.

BYOD

Timothy Surrette has a doctorate of education in curriculum and instruction from the University of Cincinnati. He has taught online educational methodology courses at the university level for four years. As an instructor, Timothy is interested in continuously improving the process of developing and managing asynchronous online discussion forums aimed at enabling his students to interact socially and collaboratively as they co-construct their conceptual knowledge and skills.

Session Materials

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Swivl: Capture, Reflect, Share!
May 18 @ 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm

I will cover the basics of how to use the Swivl robot, first modeling and then asking for participants to try it out (participants will be asked to capture their thinking surrounding an academic question/ problem-solving situation). While the cost of the hardware will be made transparent to participants, the potential uses of such a tool for video capture and export/ uploading will also be shared and discussed. This session may be especially useful for faculty seeking ways to foster metacognition, content deliver in a flipped or blended model, or for those who wish to video students singularly or in small groups.

Alana is an Instructional Designer and adjunct faculty member in the College of Education at UMPI. She was a middle and high school English teacher for 16 years in RSU 39 (Caribou) and is currently completing her Doctorate of Education. Her professional interests include content area literacy, proficiency-based education, and Habits of Mind. She and husband, Erich, and four sons operate a small family farm in Westmanland.

Active Learning Simulator
May 18 @ 1:20 pm – 2:10 pm

Technology ToolsExperience what it’s like to be a student participating in a course designed with technology-enhanced active learning strategies! You will collaborate with your fellow “classmates”, play with some new technology, and maybe pick up something new for your pedagogical toolkit. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptop or other device to participate, but it is not required. You will also need to access a maine.edu or Google account. Finally, we recommend you look over some of the session materials ahead of time via this link: goo.gl/fxL1U3

BYOD

Michael Matis is a Learning Designer at the University of Southern Maine’s Center for Technology Enhanced Learning. His M.Ed in Instructional Technology combined with his background as a veteran IT Professional have given him a broad skill-set in the integration of technology that focuses on learner-centric outcomes, coaching fellow educators to increase their digital resilience, and designing authentic assessments.

Angela is the Assistant Director of US:IT Classroom Technology. She has worked with the University of Southern Maine since 2001 and became a part of the US:IT Classroom Technology team in June 2015. Angela’s experience in the classroom technology field includes design, construction and installation of a wide-range of systems across the University of Maine System. She works closely with faculty, staff and students to improve their teaching and learning environments.

Enhancing student engagement in asynchronous online courses
May 18 @ 1:20 pm – 2:10 pm

Teaching & LearningIn this workshop, participants will discuss strategies and techniques that increase student-content, student-student, and student-instructor engagement in asynchronous online courses using readily available software that does not increase costs to students (i.e. Blackboard and VoiceThread). Examples include, utilizing the quiz feedback function, presenting new material via VoiceThread, offering extra credit for identifying errors, graded discussion board threads, peer feedback on course artifacts, weekly announcements, instructor commentaries, participation monitoring and lab-like activities. Participants will share their experience and brainstorm new approaches to increasing engagement in courses in their disciplines.

Michael R. Stevenson earned his B.A. in Psychology (with distinction), and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Developmental Psychology from Purdue University. In 1984, he was honored with the McKeachie Early Career Teaching Award by the American Psychological Association (APA). Since then, his scholarly work has consistently appeared in a wide variety of books, interdisciplinary periodicals, and psychology journals. As Professor of Psychology at the USM, he teaches Introduction to Psychology, The Psychology of Human Sexuality, The Psychology of Gender, and Psychology in the Public Interest in an asynchronous online format.

Damien holds an MA in American Studies from Northwestern University, an MS from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in Administrative Leadership, and a PhD in Urban Education from UW-Milwaukee, with a specialization in adult, continuing, and higher education leadership, with a focus on instructional design and learning technology. His research interests include telecommuting and collaboration and learning in virtual teams.

Faculty Interest Group: Building a Community of Practice :: CANCELLED ::
May 18 @ 1:20 pm – 2:10 pm

Approximately 20% of USM’s classroom “seats” in the fall of 2015 were in online or blended courses. In the fall of 2016, USM formed a Faculty Interest Group (FIG) entitled Engaging Online and Blended Learners The purpose of this FIG was to bring together faculty and staff to deepen understanding of the student experience in online and blended courses. The focus has been on the “end user”, namely the student, and how we can employ evidence-based practices for course design, course delivery, and student support services to maximize student engagement, learning, and retention. The intent was for those involved in the FIG, both from the core group and the drop-in participant, to disseminate the ideas and practices as widely as possible throughout the institution, and to develop a higher level of expertise in this arena. The FIG has been comprised of faculty from an array of disciplines, a course designer from CTEL, and student support personnel. This panel session will provide you with an overview of the first year of this FIG’s experience, and some tips for establishing a similar model on your campus.

Paul Dexter received his Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Saint Michael’s College in 1992, and in 1995 earned his Master of Social Work degree from Salem State College. Paul was awarded his Ph.D. in Public Policy from USM’s Muskie School of Public Service in 2015, with his dissertation research on the relationship between student engagement and success among online undergraduates. Paul is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of Maine, and is certified as a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Practitioner. He completed a certificate in online teaching from Sloan-C, and is a certified Global Career Development Facilitator. Paul has taught at USM since 2004, often in blended or online formats. He developed and teaches the Using Technology in Adult Learning course for the Master’s in Adult and Higher Education program, and is an instructor in USM’s Leadership and Organizational Studies program, teaching Leading Through Conflict. During his 17 years at USM, Paul has served as a Coordinator of the Student Success Center, the Director of Early Student Success, and as a clinician in University Counseling Services. He is currently the Coordinator of Learning Support at USM’s Learning Commons.

Charlie Bernacchio is an Associate Professor of Counselor Education and coordinator of Rehabilitation Counseling at the University of Southern Maine. His doctoral studies was focused on counseling special populations which he completed at the University of Maine in 2003. The clinical phase of his doctoral training focused on counseling supervision, and the use of various supervision models. He’s presented nationally on technology-assisted clinical supervision in rehabilitation counseling. In 2016, he facilitated a supervision panel for the SAMHS Behavioral Health Workforce Development initiative. Since returning to the University of Southern Maine in 2011, he successfully developed the new nationally, accredited Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling graduate studies. Dr. Bernacchio has directed the Division of Rehabilitation Counseling & Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 2006-2010. He was co-chair of the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Council of National Council of Rehabilitation Education (NCRE) from 2011-13 and currently serves as regional representative for the New England graduate rehabilitation counseling programs on the NCRE Board. Dr. Charlie finishes his final term this year as a Commissioner for Council On Rehabilitation Education that reviews accreditation standings of all degree programs nationally. In 2008, he served as a member of the USPRA National Task Force Recovery Based Training for Practitioners and Mental Health Services Providers project that developed online curriculum for preparation to obtain the psychiatric rehabilitation practitioner certification, funded by SAMHSA.

Sean Bailey is an Assistant Professor of Mathematics at the University of Southern Maine and the Coordinator of Developmental Math. Before coming to USM, he received his PhD in Math from Utah State University, as well as a Master’s in Math from Utah State and a Master’s in Education from University of Oregon. He has taught online courses at multiple institutions, ranging from developmental math courses to computer game design courses.

Go the Distance: Student Service Coordinators as your distance learning allies
May 18 @ 1:20 pm – 2:10 pm

Supporting StudentsDistance learning provides vital learning opportunities for today’s college students, who are much more likely to be over the age of 25, be employed and/or have family and household responsibilities.  Student Service Coordinators at University College assist distance learning students  with a variety of technology challenges as well as  academic and non academic concerns.  The first section of this presentation will be a  panel discussion focusing on the direct support Student Services Coordinators provide to students in the distance learning environment to promote academic success and persistence. Following the presentation, faculty are invited to share their experiences, ask questions about services we can provide, and make suggestions for strengthening our collaborative efforts on behalf of students.

Ann Delaney has been the Student Services Coordinator at University College at Ellsworth since September 2008.  From 1999-2008 Ann worked at Eastern Maine Community College in positions including Center Director for Belfast, Assistant Director of Business and Industry Services, and Interim Assistant Academic Dean. She will graduate with her Master of Science in Adult Education in May 2018.

Laurie Grant is the Student Services Coordinator at University College in Saco.  She has over 20 years experience in higher education and is dedicated to helping individuals find success in college and beyond.  Laurie holds a Master of Science in Adult and Higher Education from the University of Southern Maine.

Shelley Taylor is the Student Services Coordinator at the University College Bath/Brunswick. Previously she worked for New Ventures Maine as a career advisor and workshop facilitator.  Shelley holds a Master of Science in Adult and Higher Education from the University of Southern Maine, an undergraduate degree from the University of Maine at Farmington, and certification as a Career Development Facilitator (GCDF).

Hello, Blackboard, is anyone there?
May 18 @ 1:20 pm – 2:10 pm

How can an instructor engage students within Blackboard? Blackboard is capable of many great things, and this session introduces and demonstrates the concept of online engagement with students on Blackboard. Participants will learn and will contribute their own experience how to use Blackboard communication tools in their course. We will discuss recommended Blackboard practice in teaching and learning. This workshop suits anyone who is involved in online or “blended” teaching, whether new to Blackboard or those who would like to refresh their use of Blackboard in teaching.

 

With over 15 years of full-time classroom teaching experience at the University Maine, Colby College and Bates College, Andrei Strukov understands needs and challenges that faculty face – and he speaks their language. He strongly believes that student engagement in any course – face-to-face, distance, or blended – is the key to success for student achievement and faculty expectations of learning outcomes.

Interpersonal Communication with Eight Talking Screens: Teaching a Participatory Class via Video-Conferencing
May 18 @ 1:20 pm – 2:10 pm

In the spring 2016, long-time UMA adjunct instructor Carol Trimble learned she would be teaching her fall Interpersonal Communication course by video-conferencing. Carol had taught the course for years as an on-site participatory course in which students worked in groups to explore and practice communication concepts and techniques. She had never taught a distance-learning course, much less one involving 25 students over 8 sites. In this conference session, Carol and Instructional Designer Anne Fensie will discuss and demonstrate how they successfully re-created the participatory course using Polycom, Google Hangouts, and Blackboard, and incorporating both new and proven teaching strategies. Carol’s students worked in groups during class time, not only with students at their own site but also with students from other sites. A variety of teaching techniques ensured that every student contributed to the class discussion in every class. A classroom community with effective communication was created among students from Houlton to Saco….and many sites in between. Anne and Carol will show how to make it work: the basics of teaching with video-conferencing including some helpful Dos and Don’ts; classroom management and communication techniques and suggestions; and a participatory demonstration of how Carol incorporated Google Hangouts into her class.

Since 1993, Carol Trimble has taught oral and written communication as an adjunct faculty member for the University of Maine at Augusta. She has also taught workshops throughout Maine and in other states. She finds it especially rewarding to help others find their voice in expressing themselves orally and in writing. Carol also worked in nonprofit management and advocacy for 20 years, serving as executive director of the Maine Alliance for Arts Education for ten years. For nonprofit organizations and agencies, she has provided consulting services on written and oral communication and on arts education, including workshops, grant writing, program evaluation, and meeting facilitation.

Anne Fensie is an Instructional Designer with University College with an office in Augusta serving faculty throughout the state. Anne has taught at the high school level, in college, and through adult education. Her experience includes teaching, professional development, curriculum writing, and administration. With a focus on improving education outcomes for all learners, faculty find her patience and resourcefulness a welcome support. Anne is a specialist in Microsoft products and is skilled in multimedia production, including web design and video editing. Anne earned her Bachelor of Music Education from Ithaca College and a Master of Education in Instructional Technology from Bridgewater State College.

Orienting New Students to Blackboard
May 18 @ 1:20 pm – 2:10 pm

Supporting StudentsIn a face-to-face class, students often don’t need to be reminded how to use the classroom. The front of the class and learning interactions are recognizable. Often signified by a whiteboard, projector, desks, chairs, a door that opens or closes depending on things happening in the classroom, a basket to collect student work, and often a clock that tells students when things start and stop. Unlike typical face-to-face classes, though, where the heuristics of a classroom can signal important transitions to students about when, or even how, to hand in work, online classes can vary in these respects.

In this session, we will discuss important differences that students new to learning in the online experience through Blackboard will need to know to be successful. We will also examine strategies and resources for onboarding students to the online classroom through Blackboard.

Safety Net: Online Behavior Management Strategies
May 18 @ 1:20 pm – 2:10 pm

In this session, collaborators from multiple campuses and offices will deliver a toolkit designed to help faculty manage online behaviors. Have you ever had a student cyber-stalked by another student in your class? Have you ever been bullied or coerced by one of your students? Has a student reported feeling uncomfortable or afraid of the way another student was discussing something in the discussion board? Online behaviors are held to the same Code of Conduct as f2f behaviors, but sometimes those behaviors present themselves differently online than f2f and administrators, faculty, and other students don’t know what to do. This session will offer several strategies to design a secure, safe, respectful online class environment, as well as resources and people where faculty or students can go if they feel unsafe in an online class.

Araminta “Mina” Matthews is the Senior Instructional Designer for University College and the primary coordinator of the UC Faculty Institute. She has oversight of UC’s online writing lab (VAWLT), the Teaching Online Community of Practice (formerly known as the Short Course), and UC’s new career-integration and exploration service (VOICES). She leads a collaborative team of instructional designers for University College. Her passion is supporting collaborations, designing strong eLearning pedagogy with an efficient workflow to help students achieve the greatest success, and offering workshops to boost comfort with technology-enhanced teaching and learning. Mina holds a terminal degree in Creative Writing (MFA) as well as certificates in teaching, digital curation, and global career development facilitation. In her spare time, she is also an adjunct, teaching creative writing at various campuses in the system, and she is a professional author of genre fiction.

Paul serves as USM’s Director of Online Teaching and Learning, where he oversees the Center for Technology Enhanced Learning. Prior to joining USM in 2015, Paul was the Director of the Faculty Center for Instructional Design and Educational Technology for Saint Joseph’s College of Maine, where he oversaw the instructional design, faculty development, and student technical support operations for the College’s online programs. During his tenure at Saint Joseph’s College he worked in various other capacities, including as project manager for the implementation of a Sloan Foundation grant, and working directly with students as an academic advisor. He has also taught classroom-based writing courses for the Pennsylvania State University and Central Maine Community College and online courses in writing, early American literature, and business communications for Saint Joseph’s College. He holds degrees from Tufts University and The Pennsylvania State University, and is currently working on a Ph.D. in Public Policy and Educational Leadership.

James Cook is an Assistant Professor of Social Science at the University of Maine at Augusta. He received a B.A. from Oberlin College in 1993, and a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona in 2000. His primary areas of interest in research and teaching regard social networks in politics, with applications to social media, gender and state legislatures.

Sarah E. Holmes is Assistant Dean of Students and Deputy Title IX Coordinator at the University of Southern Maine. Working with students and colleagues to create communities where respect, growth, and learning are all core components is at the heart of the work that she is engaged in on campus. Sarah has a Master’s Degree in Adult Education and is currently working on a Ph.D. in Public Policy and Education Leadership.

Using Zoom to Create Authentic Online Learning for Volunteers :: CANCELLED ::
May 18 @ 1:20 pm – 2:10 pm

This workshop will look at how we used ZOOM, a video-conferencing platform, to engage volunteers in hands-on virtual learning experiences. Participants will engage in a hands-on science activity, learn how to adapt it for a virtual experience, gain tips and hear lessons learned. Participants will utilize a template to plan out their own virtual session and brainstorm ways to utilize videoconferencing technology with their class.

 

For the past two years, Jennifer Lobley has been delivering professional development opportunities to volunteers using the Zoom platform. She has presented at a national workshop regarding this mode of volunteer training and was featured in Afterschool Today as a co-author of an article and has another article regarding this method of training being reviewed currently for publication.

Active Learning Simulator
May 18 @ 2:20 pm – 3:40 pm

Technology ToolsExperience what it’s like to be a student participating in a course designed with technology-enhanced active learning strategies! You will collaborate with your fellow “classmates”, play with some new technology, and maybe pick up something new for your pedagogical toolkit. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptop or other device to participate, but it is not required. You will also need to access a maine.edu or Google account. Finally, we recommend you look over some of the session materials ahead of time via this link: goo.gl/fxL1U3

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Michael Matis is a Learning Designer at the University of Southern Maine’s Center for Technology Enhanced Learning. His M.Ed in Instructional Technology combined with his background as a veteran IT Professional have given him a broad skill-set in the integration of technology that focuses on learner-centric outcomes, coaching fellow educators to increase their digital resilience, and designing authentic assessments.

Angela is the Assistant Director of US:IT Classroom Technology. She has worked with the University of Southern Maine since 2001 and became a part of the US:IT Classroom Technology team in June 2015. Angela’s experience in the classroom technology field includes design, construction and installation of a wide-range of systems across the University of Maine System. She works closely with faculty, staff and students to improve their teaching and learning environments.

An Introduction to Kaltura
May 18 @ 2:20 pm – 3:40 pm

The University of Maine System has recently adopted a new software for Video Lecture Capture and Video Streaming software called Kaltura. Using a laptop, mobile device, or studio quality production equipment, faculty, staff and students can record and stream lectures, announcements, responses to questions, screencasts (or recordings of what’s on the screen of your device), assignments, events and much more. Come to this session to learn a few Kaltura basics. This session will provide an overview of the software, where and how to access the tool, where and how to access training and support for yourself and your students making videos. Considerations for recording and sharing content (such as Intellectual Property, Copyright, Accessibility-design, and more), will be discussed. University College Senior eLearning Specialist, BJ Kitchin, is also a member of the implementation team and the Assistant Chair of the UMS Educational Technology Advisory Committee (ETAC). The  ETAC lead the acquisition of the Kaltura platform and has teamed with UMS:IT, campus-trainers, instructional designers, AND staff around the system to prepare for the launch of this tool.

Blackboard Speed Dating
May 18 @ 2:20 pm – 3:40 pm

Get ready for a fast-paced tip-sharing session! Bring your laptop to partner up with another participant for 10 minutes to share one of your favorite Blackboard features, a problem you’ve solved, or a resource. When the whistle blows, find another partner and share again. After four rounds, we will join together as a group to highlight our best advice and Anne Fensie will share some of her treasured tips for an engaging learning experience in Blackboard.

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Anne Fensie is an Instructional Designer with University College with an office in Augusta serving faculty throughout the state. Anne has taught at the high school level, in college, and through adult education. Her experience includes teaching, professional development, curriculum writing, and administration. With a focus on improving education outcomes for all learners, faculty find her patience and resourcefulness a welcome support. Anne is a specialist in Microsoft products and is skilled in multimedia production, including web design and video editing. Anne earned her Bachelor of Music Education from Ithaca College and a Master of Education in Instructional Technology from Bridgewater State College.

Bridging the Distance with Cloud Tools
May 18 @ 2:20 pm – 3:40 pm

Technology ToolsCloud computing is a type of computing that relies on sharing computing resources rather than having local servers or personal devices to handle applications.

In cloud computing, the word cloud is used as a metaphor for “the Internet,” so the phrase cloud computing means “a type of Internet-based computing,” where different services — such as servers, storage and applications — are delivered to an organization’s computers and devices through the Internet or even their Intranet.

Some tools that might be treated as “cloud-based” because they don’t require that an application be installed on your local harddrive.  Besides Blackboard, UMaine System has a few tools — some of them fairly new — that can help you bridge the distance between you and your students — regardless of the location of your course — online, blended, or classroom-based.

In this session, we will look at Box.com, Google Drive as it compares to Box, some tips and tricks for utilizing Google tools, and an elearning solution that might help your students get up to speed.

How to Level Up Your Course’s Online Community
May 18 @ 2:20 pm – 3:40 pm
Technology ToolsWant to integrate your students’ work in a virtual space, so they can see and support each other when they’re online? Google Apps like Calendar, Forms, Groups, and Drive help the UC VAWLT team to create and review shared documents, schedules, and more. Your students can do the same! Join us to learn how to carry your classroom virtually using Google Suite.
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As Coordinator of the UC VAWLT (Virtual Academic Writing and Library Tutors), Michelle is privileged to team with talented students, staff, and educators to deliver writing support across the UMaine System. She also enjoys working in distance education as a part of the University College Instructional Design and Development Department. A poet and short story writer, Michelle earned a BA in English and Communication at the University of Delaware and an MFA in Fiction Writing at Columbia University. She moved to Maine in 2002 to help her husband launch an independent video rental store in Brunswick. Since 2004, she has taught English, Humanities as well as test prep courses and tutored in writing centers at UMA, USM and CMCC. As an instructor, Michelle has developed multiple seminars focused on media and writing; as a coordinator, she has served the UMA Writing Center as well as the UC VAWLT, which she established with the UC ID&D team. Michelle’s favorite things are coffee, her 7 year old, and her two cats; she hates team sports, gender-normative children’s programming, and the word “moist.”

The Power of OneSearch and RefWorks for Courses and Research
May 18 @ 2:20 pm – 3:40 pm

Engage students across disciplines with the library tools that will strengthen their academic research! In this session, librarians from across the state will introduce the online reference tools OneSearch and RefWorks. These tools serve as an easily accessible toolbox of resources to share with students as they engage in academic research. We will walk through strategies to incorporate these resources into your course design, so that students can quickly and easily access good quality sources and receive citation style guidance. This session will also include a walk-through of how to build a reading list with a combination of your content and content mined from OneSearch to share with your students and link to your classes.

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Roger Getz has been a Director of Library Services at three different academic institutions, having started at UMPI in September 2015. He has developed and presented over a dozen sessions to faculty and staff at those institutions. On this topic he presented at a Lunch and Learn program at UMPI for faculty and incorporate aspects of this presentation into almost every information literacy session he completea at UMPI.

Using ArcGIS Online in the Classroom :: CANCELLED ::
May 18 @ 2:20 pm – 3:40 pm

Technology ToolsIn this session, I will talk about the user-friendly experience of building an app, with the ArchGIS “StoryMaps” program, which allowed students to use their mobile devices to map and add narratives to locations of local historical significance. Then I will take you out on the UMA grounds to explore how this app works. If I can make this mobile app to engage students in anytime, anywhere learning, so can you!

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Kimberly R. Sebold, PhD is a professor of history at UMPI. Her focus is on local history and how to use technology to make her and her students’ research more public. She uses ArcGIS Online Story Maps and Story Map Journals in her local history classes as a way for students to tell the history of their town or family. She also also used it in her class called Cemetery Stories; in this class, each student inventoried a cemetery and then made a map in ArcGIS Online showing where all the stones were located. Then they made a Story Map Journal to show their research on the cemetery’s history as well as people in the cemetery. ArcGIS Online adds a spatial component to almost any discipline. The UMaine System subscription to ArcGIS Desktop gives us free access to ArcGIS Online.

Facilitating Polysynchronous Pedagogy for Student Access
May 18 @ 2:40 pm – 4:00 pm

Course ModalitiesThis session will showcase two faculty members in the Leadership & Organizational Studies program who taught a single course comprised of multiple delivery modalities. Each course included learners who registered for one or more of the following modalities: face-to-face, synchronous online, and asynchronous online. This course delivery model provides a choice to learners, while also building a critical mass of enrollees to successfully offer courses in the scheduled sequence without adding sections or instructors.

During any given class meeting, roughly one-third of students attend the course face-to-face in Lewiston, another third remote into the class via AdobeConnect, while the final third opt to watch a recording of the class meeting and participate only in asynchronous learning activities. Students who enroll for the asynchronous online option can still elect to participate during live class meetings as their schedules allow. Through a combination of the Google Apps suite, Blackboard, VoiceThread, and other media, these faculty created a unique multi-modal learning experience.

The faculty will describe the course design process, followed by a demonstration of a course meeting. Challenges, lessons learned, and opportunities for future applications of the model will be discussed. Come experience a simulated experience and bring your questions!

Dan Jenkins, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor and Director of the Leadership & Organizational Studies program at the University of Southern Maine. Dan received his doctorate in Curriculum & Instruction (Higher Education Administration) as well as an M.A. in Political Science from the University of South Florida, and a B.S. in Communication Studies from The Florida State University. Over the past decade, Dan has taught online, face-to-face, and blended graduate and undergraduate courses in Leadership, Organizational Theory, Technology, Political Science, and Research Methods. Additionally, Dan has published empirical research and facilitated workshops on online and blended learning in leadership education.

Paul Dexter received his Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Saint Michael’s College in 1992, and in 1995 earned his Master of Social Work degree from Salem State College. Paul was awarded his Ph.D. in Public Policy from USM’s Muskie School of Public Service in 2015, with his dissertation research on the relationship between student engagement and success among online undergraduates. Paul is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of Maine, and is certified as a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Practitioner. He completed a certificate in online teaching from Sloan-C, and is a certified Global Career Development Facilitator. Paul has taught at USM since 2004, often in blended or online formats. He developed and teaches the Using Technology in Adult Learning course for the Master’s in Adult and Higher Education program, and is an instructor in USM’s Leadership and Organizational Studies program, teaching Leading Through Conflict. During his 17 years at USM, Paul has served as a Coordinator of the Student Success Center, the Director of Early Student Success, and as a clinician in University Counseling Services. He is currently the Coordinator of Learning Support at USM’s Learning Commons.